Writing Exercises

There are a lot of writing exercises out there. There are websites full of them, and I’m sure other bloggers have them, too, so I thought I’d share a few of my own.

1) Convey some emotion in just one sentence.
This is one of my favorites, and I will explain it a bit more now. In writing, it’s very important for your description to convey the exact message you want your readers to get…sometimes. I mean, there are styles of writing that involve a heaping helping of ambiguity topped with some vague sprinkles, but I don’t usually do that. So, when you want to practice putting certain emotions into your writing, you pick one at random, and try to put it across with just one sentence. It shouldn’t be a part of any of your works in progress. What it should be is a one-liner that you treat as if it’s the only thing your reader will ever get information from, which it kinda is since this is just a writing exercise. I like to use it to help with my character development. For instance, one exercise you can try is making your reader hate, I mean absolutely loathe, a person in just one sentence. Without any other exposition or scenery, that’s a hard thing to do, but I’ll attempt it so you get what I’m trying to go for.
John was going out to fetch the paper when he saw the stray puppy, and he promptly sent a kick into its ribcage, smiling with satisfaction at its yelp of pain.
Animal abuse is a great way to go, no? So yeah, hopefully you hate this John fellow, even though this is the first and last sentence you will ever read about him. Other things you can try: Make your reader fear a person in one sentence, love a character in one sentence, want to visit a place you made up in just one sentence, want to eat a food that you describe in, you guessed it, one sentence. This exercise has limitless possibilities.
I’ll give you another one in my next post, since this one ran a bit longer than I expected it to.
Cheers!
Word of the Day: Eviscerate (v) – to remove the entrails from; disembowel
Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under books, writing

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s